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Statistics

A Profile of Older Americans: 2003

Geographic Distribution

In 2002, about half (52%) of persons 65+ lived in nine states. California had over 3.7 million; Florida 2.9 million; New York 2.5 million; Texas 2.2 million; and Pennsylvania 1.9 million. Ohio, Illinois, Michigan, and New Jersey each had well over 1 million (Figure 6).

Person 65+ constituted approximately 14% or more of the total population in 9 states in 2002 (Figure 6): Florida (17.1%); Pennsylvania (15.5%); West Virginia (15.3%); North Dakota (14.8%); Iowa (14.7%); Rhode Island (14.2%); Maine (14.4); South Dakota (14.2); and Arkansas (13.9%). In nine states, the 65+ population increased by 20% or more between 1992 and 2002 (Figure 6): Nevada (63.8%); Alaska (53.6%); Arizona (35.2%); New Mexico (28.4%); Colorado (24.3%); Hawaii (24.0%); Delaware (24.0%); Utah (23.7%) and South Carolina (20.7%). The ten jurisdictions with the highest poverty rates for elderly over the period 2000-2002 were the District of Columbia (18.8%); Mississippi (17.9%); Alabama (15.2%); Tennessee (14.6%); North Carolina (14.0%); Arkansas (15.2%); New Mexico (13.8%); Texas (13.7%); Louisiana (13.2%); and Kentucky (12.4%).

Most persons 65+ lived in metropolitan areas in 2002 (77.4%). About 50% of older persons lived in the suburbs, 27.4% lived in central cities, and 22.6% lived in nonmetropolitan areas.

The elderly are less likely to change residence than other age groups. In the five year period from 1995 to 2000, 22.8% of older persons had moved (compared to 47.7% of persons under 65). Most older movers (59.7%) stayed in the same county while only 18.8% (of the movers) moved to another state. The 85+ segment of the older population had a much high rate of moving. During this period, 32.3% of the 85+ population moved, 61.1% of them within the same county.

(Data for this section and for Figure 4 were compiled primarily from the Census Population Estimates for 2002 as well as other Internet releases of the U.S. Bureau of the Census including tables from the March 2002 Current Population Survey and “Internal Migration of the Older Population: 1995 to 2000,” Census 2000 Special Report, CENSR-10, August 2003).

Figure 4: Persons 65+ as a Percentage of Total Population - 2002

Figure 4: Persons 65+ as a Percentage of Total Population - 2002

Based on Census 2002 Population Estimates from the U.S. Bureau of the Census

Figure 5: Percentage Increase in Population 65+ -- 1992 to 2002

Figure 5: Percentage Increase in Population 65+ -- 1992 to 2002

Based on Census 2002 Population Estimates from the U.S. Bureau of the Census

Figure 6: The 65+ Population by State 2002

Numbers

Number of Persons

Percent of All Ages

Percent Increase 1992-2002

Percent Below Poverty 2000-2002

  US Total (50 States + DC)

35,601,911

12.3%

10.2%

10.2

  Alabama

588,542

13.1%

9.6%

15.2

  Alaska

39,200

6.1%

53.6%

6.3

  Arizona

701,243

12.9%

35.2%

7.5

  Arkansas

376,387

13.9%

5.6%

15.2

  California

3,716,836

10.6%

13.8%

8.4

  Colorado

434,472

9.6%

24.3%

8.2

  Connecticut

472,314

13.6%

3.7%

6.5

  Delaware

105,488

13.1%

24.0%

6.5

  District of Columbia

68,534

12.0%

-11.1%

18.8

  Florida

2,854,838

17.1%

15.2%

10.0

  Georgia

813,652

9.5%

19.3%

12.6

  Hawaii

166,910

13.4%

24.0%

8.1

  Idaho

151,141

11.3%

19.3%

6.6

  Illinois

1,499,249

11.9%

2.2%

8.6

  Indiana

757,451

12.3%

5.8%

8.9

  Iowa

432,785

14.7%

0.4%

8.4

  Kansas

355,094

13.1%

1.7%

7.9

  Kentucky

509,476

12.4%

7.0%

12.4

  Louisiana

520,446

11.6%

8.4%

13.2

  Maine

186,383

14.4%

10.8%

11.2

  Maryland

616,699

11.3%

14.1%

11.1

  Massachusetts

863,695

13.4%

2.9%

10.6

  Michigan

1,231,920

12.3%

6.8%

9.3

  Minnesota

601,741

12.0%

7.4%

9.0

  Mississippi

346,251

12.1%

6.1%

17.9

  Missouri

757,197

13.3%

3.5%

6.8

  Montana

122,806

13.5%

11.8%

9.6

  Nebraska

232,134

13.4%

2.8%

9.2

  Nevada

240,255

11.1%

63.8%

8.0

  New Hampshire

152,577

12.0%

16.9%

6.8

  New Jersey

1,121,197

13.1%

5.9%

8.4

  New Mexico

221,454

11.9%

28.4%

13.8

  New York

2,473,510

12.9%

4.0%

11.8

  North Carolina

998,391

12.0%

17.9%

14.0

  North Dakota

94,076

14.8%

1.6%

11.5

  Ohio

1,513,372

13.3%

4.2%

7.5

  Oklahoma

460,459

13.2%

6.1%

11.6

  Oregon

443,968

12.6%

8.5%

6.0

  Pennsylvania

1,908,962

15.5%

1.8%

8.4

  Rhode Island

152,286

14.2%

-0.6%

11.4

  South Carolina

503,256

12.3%

20.7%

14.2

  South Dakota

108,322

14.2%

4.4%

10.3

  Tennessee

719,177

12.4%

12.7%

14.6

  Texas

2,152,896

9.9%

19.3%

13.7

  Utah

199,041

8.6%

23.7%

10.1

  Vermont

79,241

12.9%

16.6%

10.5

  Virginia

817,441

11.2%

17.4%

9.8

  Washington

677,532

11.2%

13.0%

7.9

  West Virginia

275,974

15.3%

1.0%

10.6

  Wisconsin

706,418

13.0%

5.9%

8.0

  Wyoming

59,222

11.9%

19.4%

7.9

  Puerto Rico

449,176

11.6%

   

Population data is from the Census Bureau Population Estimates and poverty data is from the Current Population Survey, 2001, 2002, and 2003 Annual Social and Economic Supplements.

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