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Administration on Aging (AoA)

Alzheimer’s Disease Supportive Services Program

The Purpose of the Program

The Alzheimer’s Disease Supportive Services Program (ADSSP) supports state efforts to expand the availability of community-level supportive services for persons with Alzheimer’s Disease and Related Disorders (ADRD) and their caregivers. Formerly known as the Alzheimer’s Disease Demonstration Grants to the States (ADDGS), the ADSSP was created by Section 398 of the Public Health Services Act. Under Administration on Aging’s leadership and in collaboration with the Aging Network, the ADSSP National Resource Center, and a variety of state and community partners, the ADSSP supports the creation of responsive, integrated, and sustainable service delivery systems for individuals with ADRD and their family caregivers across the United States.

The Administration on Aging’s Alzheimer’s Disease Supportive Services Program:

  • Delivers supportive services and facilitates informal support for persons with ADRD and their family caregivers using proven models and innovative practice;
  • Translates evidence-based models that have proven beneficial for persons with ADRD and their family caregivers into community-level practice; and
  • Advances state initiatives toward coordinated systems of home and community-based care – linking public, private, and non-profit entities that develop and deliver supportive services for individuals with ADRD and their family caregivers.

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Current Projects

Under the direction of AoA and the support of the ADSSP National Resource Center, these projects continue to advance the ADSSP mission by offering coordinated supportive services to individuals with ADRD and their family caregivers across the nation. Between 2008 and 2011, AoA funded 80 ADSSP projects across the nation. These projects focus on three key efforts: dissemination of evidence-based programs; creation of integrated, dementia capable service systems; and exploration of new models of care.

Through the Evidence-Based Cooperative Agreements to Better Serve People with Alzheimer’s Disease and Related Disorders states demonstrate how existing evidence-based interventions that help people with ADRD and their family caregivers can be translated into effective supportive service programs at the community level. AoA’s evidence-based ADRD programs closely replicate specific interventions that have been tested through randomized-controlled clinical trials with the results published in peer-reviewed journals. As a result of rigorous research and clinical trials, there are evidence-based programs that improve the health and wellbeing of persons with ADRD and/or their caregivers. Interventions currently being translated through the ADSSP include: Resources for Enhancing Alzheimer’s Caregiver Health (REACH) II, Savvy Caregiver, Star-Caregiver, Reducing Disability in Alzheimer’s Disease (R-DAD), the New York University Caregiver Intervention (NYUCI) (PDF, 26KB) and Coping with Caregiving (PPT, 26KB).

AoA’s Systems Integration Programs to Create Dementia Capable, Sustainable Service Systems for Persons with Dementia and Their Family Caregivers focus on integration of a statewide set of programs that includes a Single Entry Point/No Wrong Door access for individuals. These programs also promote access to a comprehensive, sustainable set of high quality services relevant to the population residing in the state’s service area, with an emphasis on incorporating dementia capability into these services.

Through the Innovation Cooperative Agreements to Better Serve People with Alzheimer’s Disease and Related Disorders, states and their partners are exploring innovative approaches to improving the delivery of supportive services at the community-level to people with ADRD and their family caregivers. These programs aim to: 1) enable individuals with ADRD to remain living in the community longer; 2) provide services for those in the early stages of ADRD; and 3) reform state systems so that they are better equipped to serve persons with dementia and their caregivers in efficient and cost effective ways.

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Resources and Useful Links

2014 ACL/CDC/NIA Webinar Series on Alzheimer's Disease and Related Dementias

2014 ADSSP Webinars

2013 Learning Collaborative Materials

2013 NIA/ACL Webinar Series (Information PDF, 404KB)

  • Webinar #1 (May 23, 2013): Updates on Alzheimer’s Disease Research and Resources
  • Webinar #2 (June 25, 2013): People with Intellectual or Developmental Disabilities and Dementia
  • Webinar #3 (July 24, 2013): Diverse Populations, Health Disparities and Dementia
  • Webinar #4 (August 20, 2013): Younger Onset Dementia
  • Webinar #5 (September 24, 2013): Advanced Stage Dementia and Palliative Care

White Paper: Translating Innovation to Impact: Evidence-based interventions to support people with Alzheimer’s disease and their caregivers at home and in their communities. Presents the findings and recommendations from a review of the state of the art of non-pharmacological treatments and care practices for people with Alzheimer’s or other dementias and their family caregivers. It is intended to support deliberations by the Advisory Council on Alzheimer’s Research, Care and Services, the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services (HHS) and other government and private organizations about how to make effective non-pharmacological treatments and care practices available to people who will benefit from them. Its development resulted from a public-private partnership between AoA and the Alliance for Aging Research, with funding from the Metlife Foundation.

Webinar: Caregiving for People with Dementia and Intellectual Disabilities, Including Down Syndrome (February 14, 2013)

Webinar Series on Legal Issues and Alzheimer’s Disease

  • Webinar #1 (November 12, 2012): For Legal Professionals
    Working with People with Dementia and Assessing Client Capacity
  • Webinar #2 (December 4, 2012): For Legal Professionals
    Advance Health Care and Financial Planning for Persons with Alzheimer’s
  • Webinar #3 (December 12, 2012): For Aging Professionals
    Critical Legal Issues in Alzheimer’s
  • Webinar #4 (January 24, 2013): For Legal Professionals
    Elder Abuse, Neglect and Exploitation and Clients with Dementia

National Alzheimers Plan Webinar (August 21, 2012)

2012 Linking the Aging Network and Alzheimer’s Disease Centers (ADCs) Webinar Series
Connecting community-based agencies that help older persons to scientific researchers at ADCs to improve recruitment of Alzheimer’s disease research participants and support people with Alzheimer’s & their family caregivers.

  • Webinar #1 (May 9, 2012): “Alzheimer”s Disease and Other Dementias: Basic/Refresher Information and Current Updates for the Aging Network on Symptoms, Diagnoses and Treatments”
  • Webinar #2 (June 13, 2012): On-line Tools and Resources to Assist Individuals with Dementia and Caregivers: National Alzheimer’s Contact Center, Eldercare Locator and ADEAR (Alzheimer’s Disease Education and Referral Center
  • Webinar #3 (July 12, 2012): Connecting the Aging Network, Individuals with Dementia, and Caregivers with Research Opportunities

The Alzheimer’s Disease Supportive Services Program Resource Compendium

The Alzheimer’s Disease Supportive Services Program Resource Compendium provides technical information to grantees and other developers of programs that help people with Alzheimer’s disease and their families. At the Alzheimer’s Disease Supportive Services Program Resource Compendium, professionals can find evidence-based practices for Alzheimer’s programs. In addition, the Alzheimer’s Disease Supportive Services Program National Resource Center offers a compilation of relevant project planning tools and information.

Current Research
Below is a listing of organizations that offer information on clinical trials, findings, and treatment options:

For Alzheimer Caregivers
The government’s resource for Alzheimer’s and related dementias is Alzheimers.gov.

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Last Modified: 12/31/1600